Monday, 20 February 2012

notes

of love
at Grove Cemetery
perhaps someone more musically adept than I will recognize this first bar

20 comments:

Gene said...

A nice visual play on words. Not that I have any plans for what happens to me after I'm gone, but I love the idea of a pun living on after me.

tapirgal said...

Not me (no music reader), but you remind me that there is a whole new (in the last few decades) style of stones, and I have photographed very few of them. Time to get out the camera!

Lowell said...

I don't know if this is a famous musical into but it does have a nice lilt to it...and note how the notes climb to a high G.

Virginia said...

I think the musical notes say so much here. I"m happy to join this group. My friend in Cincinnati DRUG me to cemeteries in Paris and I'm not really enjoying photographing them.
V

Sondra said...

thats a very impressive headstone, I think its a cresendo....But I really have no clue..lol

Peter said...

can you hum a few bars? maybe its Beethoven 5th, da da da daaa!

Oakland Daily Photo said...

Having no idea about the musical notes, I focused on the first names. Really like them. Reminds me a little of Nick and Nora.

VioletSky said...

Flora and Ellery have such a musical tone to their names. And such a nice flow to them when said together!

Herding Cats said...

This makes me wish I had paid much more attention during music lessons. such a beautiful stone.

Julie said...

I think VJ meant to type 'now' ...

Julie said...

The key signature indicates C Major as there are no sharps or flats following. However, C Major only goes up to one octave from Middle C. However, only one note on Flora & Ellery's headstone is within this octave. Therefore, it is 'sharp' or raised in pitch. Methinks they were being ironic. The other thing is that the surname 'Sharpe' usually ends with an 'e', but the musical concept does not have the trailing 'e', so it could just be that they had had a gutful of people mispelling their surname.

Fun things that one can find in cemeteries.

hamilton said...

oh, now it makes more sense..... :)
I was feeling a little bad for you V!

hamilton said...

Thank you, Julie!
I tried looking them up, but could find no info - but they are in an old phone book I still have kicking around!

NixBlog said...

Sorry, Julie... not accurate. Yes, the music is in C major (could also be A minor, but the harmony indicates a C major chord). However, C major is C major no matter what the register, I.e. all the white notes of the piano keyboard from very very low C to very very high C are all still C major.

Now if they really wanted to pun on their name, they would have included two sharps (one for each ;-) in the key signature making the key D major.

Nice shot!

NixBlog said...

OK, here is what it sounds like. The first bar is just what is on the headstone. The following bars I have dressed up a bit to underline the C major tonality. Cheery and fanfare-like, I don't recognise it as anything of note. How about anyone else?

http://f.cl.ly/items/0C1o460t3W22031W0b3O/Sharp.wav

Jenn Jilks said...

It's a bugle 'charge' of some sort. Something like the notes in this Calvary First call!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-jzmBjQ48g

NixBlog said...

Try this link: http://cl.ly/0N070w1d1S2X3f1w411f

NixBlog said...

PS: Cut and paste into browser.

hamilton said...

ah - got it. had to use Chrome.
Thanks.

CaT said...

hahaha. funny. we tried to hum it here. hahaha.
comments were funny too.. :)